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Back in 1989, Jim Ginsburg, a recent University of Chicago graduate and the son of then-federal judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg, began law school. A few years later, Ginsburg gave up his studies to devote his time to Cedille Records, a new classical recording company he founded in Hyde Park. 

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Scores of LGBTQ people attended the Hyde Park Art Center's (HPAC) first-ever "Art of Pride" event on Sunday, with music, drag performers, art and crafts for sale and outreach from local health and social services organizations.

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TimeLine Theatre Company continues to illuminate the present by exploring the past with the Chicago premiere of “The Chinese Lady,” Lloyd Suh's compelling play about Afong Moy, purportedly the first Chinese woman to set foot in the United States. 

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In a press kit insert for “Seagull,” translator-adapter-director Yasen Peyankov explains that his version of Anton Chekhov's 1895 play “is rooted in contemporary English as spoken in the U.S.” He goes on to say he “wanted to give American audiences an opportunity to experience the play as th…

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Actress and author Zoe Kazan's “After The Blast” is a domestic drama set in a dystopian future. Its Chicago premiere at Broken Nose Theatre, directed by JD Caudill, is engrossing despite how long it takes to set up the situation, some unnecessary digressions and limited resources.

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The South Side’s premier classical music presenter ended its 2021–22 season earlier this month with two memorable concerts. University of Chicago Presents (UCP) closed out the performing year with the final installment in the Sound/Sites series and followed that a few days later with an earl…

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The South Side’s premier classical music presenter ended its 2021–22 season earlier this month with two memorable concerts. University of Chicago Presents (UCP) closed out the performing year with the final installment in the Sound/Sites series and followed that a few days later with an earl…

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The Century of Progress International Exposition, also known as the Chicago World’s Fair, took place from 1933 to 1934 and changed the life of composer Florence Price. It was for this international event that her first symphony was selected as one of the works for a celebratory Chicago Symph…

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Photography and memory are at the center of Naomi Iizuka's “At the Vanishing Point,” which was written nearly two decades ago and is receiving a solid, moving Chicago premiere by Gift Theatre. 

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The title “All's Well That Ends Well” suggests that the end justifies the means, but that's not entirely the case in Chicago Shakespeare Theater's uneven production of the Bard's “problem” comedy directed by Shana Cooper. 

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A couple enjoys a performance by Ari Brown (saxophone) and Josh Abrams (bass) as the Smart Museum of Art marks the closing of an exhibit of work by painter Bob Thompson with a full day of events on Saturday, May 14. 

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Longing, love, loss and loneliness merge in “Intimate Apparel,” two-time Pulitzer Prize for Drama winner (for “Ruined” and “Sweat”) Lynn Nottage's lovely 2003 drama about a talented Black seamstress making a life for herself in Lower Manhattan in 1905. 

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Chicago Opera Theater’s latest world premiere is a fascinating look at a mostly unknown corner of British American history. During the American Revolutionary War, the British offered emancipation, transportation to another British dominion and a pension for slaves who would fight with the Br…

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There was anticipation in the air Saturday night at International House here in Hyde Park as a substantial audience formed to hear the Newberry Consort. There was also a warm and sunny feeling among the crowd. They had gathered knowing that this would be the last Hyde Park concert for David …

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“A Moment, A Memory,” a new photography exhibition at The Silver Room, features a series of candid portraits taken by Jansen Bridge, a 38-year-old Florida native who said that he wanted to capture the essence of those he feels “add more value to the city than they take.”

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Last year, the Herald reported that summer festival organizers were planning a full slate of the local events residents know and love, all of which had been canceled in 2020.

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With the invasion of Ukraine about to move into its third month, it might seem like an unfortunate time to publish a book arguing that war is actually uncommon. But for Christopher Blattman, a professor at the University of Chicago’s Pearson Institute for the Study and Resolution of Global C…

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When Tyla Abercrumbie's “Relentless” opened TimeLine Theatre Company's 25th anniversary season earlier this year, I called it the best new play I'd seen in a long time. Apparently a lot of people felt the same way, and now the family drama set in 1919 has moved to the Goodman Owen Theatre fo…

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“What to Send Up When It Goes Down,” which made its debut in Chicago last month, is a production with several distinct components. While it includes a scripted play, audience participation is also a significant part of the show — the aim is to explore police violence against Black people and…

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Although Hyde Park is several miles from the Loop, Chicago’s city center, it is one of our metropolitan area’s premier locations of classical music. This is in large measure due to the University of Chicago, which offers a wide range of high-quality musical performances, from world-class pro…

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In a fictionalized Englewood, a City Council candidate puts up a billboard that reads “The most dangerous place for a Black child is his mother’s womb.” A nearby women’s clinic fights back with its own provocative sign: “Black women take care of their families by taking care of themselves. A…

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Thursday night was the Chicago premiere of one of the most anticipated new operas in years. “Fire Shut Up in My Bones,” with music by Terence Blanchard and libretto by Kasi Lemmons, based on the memoir of the same name by New York Times columnist and Black News Channel anchor Charles M. Blow…

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The Korngold Rediscovered festival, held by the University of Chicago in partnership with Folks Operetta, offered the North American premiere of Erich Wolfgang Korngold’s opera “Die Kathrin” on Thursday night at the Logan Center Performance Hall.

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Sean Hayes' stunning performance makes “Good Night, Oscar” a “must see,” but there are plenty of reasons not to miss the world premiere of Doug Wright's extraordinary play at the Goodman Theatre before it almost undoubtedly heads to Broadway.

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After the South Side’s first COVID-19 patient touched down at Midway airport in February 2020, Dr. Thomas Fisher received them at the University of Chicago Medical Center (UCMC). Within a matter of weeks, the pandemic tore through the city and, in particular, the South and West sides. 

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“Korngold Rediscovered” is a ten-day festival celebrating the life and work of composer Erich Wolfgang Korngold, currently underway at the University of Chicago. Concluding on April 10, the festival features concerts, lectures, a film screening, a scholarly symposium and the North American p…

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The Museum of Science and Industry’s annual Family Day on Saturday, April 2, drew families of all kinds into the museum’s exhibits — kindergarteners chased each other through crowded exhibits, a woman pushed her mother-in-law’s wheelchair, a young girl quietly examined paintings with her aunt.